This Travel Blogger Is Isolating On World's Most Remote Coronaless-Island & Now I Miss The Beach - Viral Bake
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Quanatrining on a beach in Bora Bora or Maldives would have been a great story to tell but, sigh, let’s put that thought aside and focus on this travel blogger’s story who got the chance to isolate in one of the world’s most remote islands.

Polish blogger and YouTuber Eva zu Beck has spent the last two months on Yemen’s remote island of Socotra – a place with an ecosystem so unique that it’s often referred to as the “Galapagos of the Indian Ocean”.

She recalls she had a choice to either return to Europe or stay back in Socotra and for the travel blogger she is, she decided to go with the later. The best part? There is no Coronavirus in Socotra and the island is empty most of the time as no visitors are allowed.

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JUST A SIMPLE, LITTLE, RADICAL DREAM. When I wake up with the fan rotating in endless circles above my head, I let myself believe it’s the morning breeze caressing my face. Why is this so rare? When the lights come on, I imagine it’s the sun lighting up the world and the sky as it rises above my head and not a roof. Why is this so radical? When the cars and bikes and feet start to beat to a rhythm on the streets outside, I pretend to hear birds and waves singing me a morning song. Why does this make me a romantic? Living in a forest, or sleeping on the beach, or foraging for food – when did these become such “radical” ways to live? Most likely, if you suggest that this is the life you’d like to build, you’ll be accused of romanticism. “You would get bored”, “that’s not how people live in the 21st century”, “you’d miss the comforts of a city”, they’d say. When did we become so spoilt? So out of touch with ourselves? A single stroke of destiny comes along and halts the economies we’ve been protecting so jealously, renders many luxuries worthless, and reveals a world that is stubborn but, at the same time, immensely fragile. Cities teeming with people, pollution, traffic jams, noise, invasive media, even more invasive governments. When did this become the less radical reality? Less radical than the natural joy that springs from spending a night in the open air. Less radical than taking in the sun, the breeze and the waves, every day. As for me, I’ve moved out of my tent and have been sleeping on the beach ❤️ Who else is a radical, then? 😉 Photo: dronefie

A post shared by Eva zu Beck ♡ Adventure Travel (@evazubeck) on

“There is no Coronavirus in Socotra and since nobody new has arrived in the last week (the island has been shut off to new arrivals since I came), it seems like a much safer place to be than any European city, or international airport,” the YouTuber explained in an Instagram post. “So, I decided to stay. I am officially waiting out the pandemic on an isolated desert island. With no plans to leave.”

In the posts she shares on her Instagram, she tells how she has been relying on locals for shelter and fishing for food and enjoying her time on the island.

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WHAT’S THE SITUATION WITH COVID-19 ON SOCOTRA ISLAND? This is DAY 21 on the island, and as we enter a new month, I want to update you on the local situation. First and foremost, according to the local health authorities, there is no Coronavirus on Socotra Island. All the foreigners here were examined by a doctor, as a safety precaution, in the first week of our stay. Everyone is healthy. Flights haven’t been arriving for 21 days. Domestic passenger boats have been on hold for around 2 weeks. Cargo boats have been asked to quarantine for several days on the sea before coming in to port, but a regular stream of supplies continues to come in for the local population of 60k people. It seems like the authorities are doing a good job at isolating the island. I used to call this our “desert island quarantine” but I’ve now realized that was a mistake, because there is no quarantine on Socotra. People here are lucky to be able to continue as normal. For many of my friends around the world, the quarantine means being confined to the walls of their urban home, and that’s a much stricter reality than the one we are living. Our Socotri friends have been deeply welcoming, and of course some have offered to find me a local husband so I can live here forever. 😅🙈 I don’t think I’m quite there yet! I should also add, I’m not the only foreigner here. There are around 15 in total – all have been here as long as, or longer than me. Some stayed willingly and others didn’t have a choice – they missed the last commercial flight off the island. Some of us have become friends and are staying in the remote eastern corner of Socotra, where the Arabian Sea meets the Indian Ocean. The closest shop and antenna (where I can get internet, like now) are two hours away by motorbike. In between hiking and writing, I’m working on a couple of local community projects which I’d love to bring to life if I stay here a bit longer, and if things continue to be this calm here. One is related to raising local awareness about the plastic problem across the island, and the other – to preserving the local heritage. That’s my reality for a while to come. What’s yours? Sending you my love! 💛🙏

A post shared by Eva zu Beck ♡ Adventure Travel (@evazubeck) on

“There are no social distancing or lockdown measures on Socotra,” she tells CNN. “We are free to visit friends and move around as we please. It’s as if we’re in a parallel universe.”

She also revealed that locals in the region are a fan of Bollywood movies and have picked up broken Hindi from the movies.
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THE LANGUAGE WE ALL SPEAK, THE MOST AWKWARD AND BEAUTIFUL OF ALL. Every other evening, after dinner, I get visitors on my little verandah. They’re girls from my host family’s home. Together with their friends, they come to me in flowy dresses, with scarves wrapped around their waists and hijabs thrown loosely over their heads. After an exchange of greetings, one of them inevitably claps her hands and gets up, beckoning the others to join her. And that’s how our dance evenings begin. The girls know their Bollywood moves inside out, and they even sing along in (only slightly) broken Hindi. That’s an influence picked up from the TV, which runs on solar here. One moment, it’s all Aishwarya Rai, and the next, they’re singing an old Socotri song and rocking gently to its rhythm. When it’s my turn to dance, I usually try to get them to “teach” me and follow along. I’m the clumsiest dancer in the world, which is cause for much entertainment. Sometimes, we do solo dances though, where one of us dances, and all the other girls sit and watch. That’s when my secret weapon comes out: Britney Spears. With “Oops I Did It Again” playing on my Spotify, I start to feel like a little girl, and after that, it’s all giggles all over again. And then, back to Bollywood, in this prehistoric, tiny speck of land on the edge of the world. It’s a universal language, dance. It’s awkward, yes – but it becomes beautiful as soon as you embrace your own clumsiness, your natural movement. That’s how you begin to speak. And in that space between the dancer and the spectator, a language of universal understanding emerges. The epic photo by @rpljuscec

A post shared by Eva zu Beck ♡ Adventure Travel (@evazubeck) on

Also Read: Ok, So Turns Out That Our Favourite Disney Character, Goofy, Is Not A Dog

“The girls know their Bollywood moves inside out, and they even sing along in (only slightly) broken Hindi. That’s an influence picked up from the TV, which runs on solar here,” she wrote. “One moment, it’s all Aishwarya Rai, and the next, they’re singing an old Socotri song and rocking gently to its rhythm.”


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